Go Under THE BEATLES: YELLOW SUBMARINE with BILL MORRISON

"The Beatles: Yellow Submarine" preview
Credit: Bill Morrison/Andrew Pepoy/Nathan Kane (Titan Comics)
Credit: Bill Morrison/Andrew Pepoy/Nathan Kane (Titan Comics)
Credit: Bill Morrison/Andrew Pepoy/Nathan Kane (Titan Comics)
Credit: Bill Morrison/Andrew Pepoy/Nathan Kane (Titan Comics)
Credit: Bill Morrison/Andrew Pepoy/Nathan Kane (Titan Comics)
Credit: Bill Morrison/Andrew Pepoy/Nathan Kane (Titan Comics)
Credit: Bill Morrison/Andrew Pepoy/Nathan Kane (Titan Comics)
Credit: Bill Morrison/Andrew Pepoy/Nathan Kane (Titan Comics)

With the comic book adaptation of The Beatles: Yellow Submarine by Bill Morrison, inker Andrew Pepoy, and colorist Nathan Kane out in stoeres now, the trio have expounded on one of the stand-out scenes - seen above - for the book here for Newsarama.

Bill Morrison: This was a fun sequence to draw, though I did give my ellipse guides quite a workout and by the end I wasn’t sure if they’d hold together! Now we really do know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall, because I drew every one of them! The laws of physics don’t apply to the Sea of Holes, so it was possible to have the Beatles and Jeremy appear multiple times on that two-page spread without feeling the need to draw individual panels. Another thing I love about this section is Ringo’s throwaway “I’ve got a hole in me pocket!” joke. Normally I wouldn’t devote an entire page to a bad pun, but this bit plays a big part in the resolution of the story, so I decided it was best to give it some importance.

Andrew Pepoy: Unlike some of the pages that looked busier, this was actually one of the more time-intensive sequences. All those little holes, all my elipses, trying to match up or freehand them, and filling in each spot with ink. However, it was worth it, as the pages looked great when done. Bill did a nice job of making this sequence visually fun, and I think the added black from the holes made the Beatles pop and stand out against them.

Nathan Kane: Since the Beatles were literally standing alone in a Sea of Holes, this sequence was the easiest one to handle from a coloring standpoint. The blank backgrounds were a nice contrast to the more painterly and complex pages throughout the rest of the book. It gives the eye a bit of a rest, and the playful colors choices of the fab four’s fashions really stand out. When deciding what color to use for the panel borders, the choice was clear…yellow of course!

Abrupt changes from green to red and a nebulous concentric circle background are used to convey the psychedelic transition where the lads find themselves in the now-dreary Pepperland. If you look closely, you’ll see that the Sea of Holes actually morphs into colorful clouds as Old Fred pilots the Yellow Submarine to reunite with his shipmates.

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